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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
the vote. he says, what if somebody who really doesn't like washington, like maybe their son got overlooked for promotion or some thing. washington had dirty anointed items as a vice presidential possibility. they say what if everybody votes for adam, but a few disgruntled souls strawberry vote from washington, what will happen? atoms will sneak through the presidency. so he writes letters to people in six of the 11 state. we need to throw with seven or eight those for adam. to insure against this possible. not isn't he the guy who said there's no intrigue and somehow it is secure. how could they deluded themselves to doing not? look, they're tired and want to move on, not the intuitive definition is like in entries like people whispering in the corridors of european courts and they don't even entertain the notion that entry can happen through the mail over a period of time and political interests might develop some people might focus around one candidate or another. this just doesn't occur to them or at least they don't ask the hard questions. so anyway, meanwhile the presidency is now the
think government shouldn't be involved with, for example, we don't think politicians in washington should be controlling health care choices. women are perfectly capable of making themselves. now, colorado, for eight years we had a president who shared these beliefs. his name was bill clinton. and his economic plan asked the wealthiest americans to pay a little bit more so we could reduce our deficit and invest in the skills and ideas of our people. and at the time, you may be surprised to learn that the republican congress and a senate candidate by the name of mitt romney said bill clinton's plan would kill jobs. kill the economy. turns out their math back then was just as bad as it is now. because by the end of president clinton's second term, america created 23 million new jobs. incomes were up. poverty was down. our deficit had become a surplus. so colorado, we know our ideas work because they've been tested. they've been tried. and we also know that the other folks' ideas don't work because they've been tested. after bill clinton left office, for most of the last decade, we tr
came together to take your country back. [applause] you gave washington a laser-like message to listen to the people. [applause] you have done an incredible job of getting this country turned back around to the country that our founders established, a country that came from the people and you have changed the country to your massive efforts. i compliment you for it, and it was really the way you did it. as i have said, my role in life is to be the grain of sand to the oyster. you irritates the oyster and out comes a pearl. i have been your grain of sand that you chose. it has been an honor to be your grain of sand in this process. we will continue to make pearls as necessary in the future. fair enough? [applause] the american people have spoken. they have chosen governor clinton. congratulations. >> boo! >> wait a minute. the only way we are going to make it work, if we all team up together. let's give governor clinton a big round of applause. but for get the election. forget the election. the hard work is in front of us. we must all work together to rebuild our great country. you, the
to the washington area arriving outside of washington. thursday on washington journal with both chambers returning to washington next week, we will speak with our guest about what lies ahead and scott wilson. washington journal is life every morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern. analysts and the former director participated in a bipartisan panel examining the next steps for the president and congress hosted by laszlo strategies. this is over an hour. >> who loo>> good morning. welcome. i am founder and president of this organization which is laszlo strategies. it does strategic communication but we're not partisan and i am very honored and delighted to have a terrific set of panels to offer the audience today. we have to audiences, a live audience here, we are in the rayburn office building in a hearing room of the foreign affairs committee. i would like to thank congressman berman for his service. it is an incredible thing to have to serve or be willing to serve. it is a painful process to go through negative campaigning. i think the american voters odette of gratitude to all who are willing to serve whe
deeper, that fact into this plot tonight. joining us right now is "washington post" reporter sauer ri horowitz, and david woods senior military correspondent for "the huffington post." give me a sense, i don't want people to get lost before we start, let me take may own shot at this, how the whole thing is put together. let's watch. the messy and complex web begins with david petraeus. in 2006 petraeus meets paula broadwell, a west point graduate and doctoral student after giving a speech at harvard. fast forward to may of this year. another woman, jill kelley, a friend of petraeus and his wife, begins receiving harassing e-mails. she asks a friend at the fbi to help launch an investigation. the e-mails it is eventually discovered are being sent by broadwell. the fbi also discovers that broadwell and petraeus have been having an affair. meanwhile, the fbi agent who kelley approached gross frustrated after he's kept off the case. his supervisors reportedly are concerned that he has, quote, grown obsessed with the matter. it's also uncovered that he has sent shirtless photos of himself
a cushion going into the counties around washington. >> and the more suburban -- obama will get a big a big scor. >> we haven't seen the vote tallies in virginia. and joining us on set is the arcitect -- >> call me "winner" house races? your job was to protect the majority or grow this. is it possible the republicans may net seats? >> we will get them in non- traditional areas. we will get them because we fought hard. this means you get to do a lot of things you wouldn't normally do. one goal of mine, four years ago, was to make sure we were a national party with a national message, to sell thit that way. john boehner backed it up and eric cantor with a great job. >> early numbers from ohio and virginia, you may be one of the few happy republicans in tonigh. >> how do you feel about the washington. >> we put a lot of work into this. the rcc is about winning. cantor and boehner were with us -- winning back twice. you have to prove you can do it. >> for those watching, the congressman runs the campaign committee. controls the money that is spent -- what is one district you will win tonight th
the way they are. we've seen over the last four years the status quo in washington they are powerful and they have fought us every step of the way. we've tried and succeeded in reforming our health care system. they spent millions trying to stop us. when we tried and succeeded in reforming wall street, they spent millions to push us back. we kept on going but those were tough fights. what they are counting on now is that you'll get worn down by all the squabble. you'll get fed up with the dysfunction. you'll give up on the change we fought for. you'll walk away and leave them to make decisions that affect every american. in other words, their bet is on cynicism but iowa you taught me to bet on you. you taught me to bet on hope. i'll work with anybody of any party to move this country forward. if you want to break the gridlock in congress you'll vote for leaders who feel the same way whether they're democrats or republicans or independents. the kind of iowa leaders you've always had. there's some principles you got to fight for. there are times where you got to take a stand. the price
from the outside in washington. simultaneously, there's something else under way this morning within the republican party saying we have to change. we cannot go on like this because we keep narrowing the base, and there are a lot of republicans, very senior republicans who have had success in the past and looked at that primary procedure and saw that as a prescription for what happened last night. they were running a retro campaign in the 21st century when things have changed, and the obama people were running a pote modern campaign with technology and looking at the diverse electorate we now have. >> some people say republican soul searching, other republicans say it will be civil war. >> no question. paul ryan is a leader of this party. is it that they were not conservative enough? the reality is mitt romney won a near historic portion of the white vote in america, and he suffered a very bad loss. that's because the country looks different. it has changed. the party has got to find a way to reach out to latinos, the fastest growing voting bloc to become a more diverse party with th
. i think you guys have a poll out. the nbc washington "wall street journal" poll shows him up by six. you saw romney scrambling to try to change the narrative around the auto bailout. you have the car companies with saying he hasn't been truthful. the fact is four years ago, the unemployment rate was 12%. it's around 7% now. so they are looking at an economy that has improved over the last four years. it's hard for romney's campaign to gain traction there in talking about the economy being so horrible because the reality there is that it has improved. >> john, every credible poll shows romney behind in ohio. do you see it plausible he takes that state? >> the plausible scenario for mitt romney in ohio and other battleground states that are very close like florida or virginia, colorado, that sort of thing, the intensity, the enthusiasm for romney, the zeal of his electle electoral rat, te is built around enthusiasm and what the likely voters screens produce. what we're seeing nationally in our poll today is a 48%/47% race. there's a bit of a mystery to that. it's part art and part sci
around louunn coty. the average income is $115,000. very close to washington d.c. in the southwest in dickinson county $29,000. >> it's a tremendous disparity. so much of those jobs in that urban crescent are defense-related. that's been a particular issue in this campaign. as this state looks to what may happen after the election with regard to see questions traition of those automatic and indiscriminate cuts that will take place in january 2 if the spending plan is not developed. so there's a lot of attention, a lot of focus on what may happen after see questions traition. that will be deeply interesting to those people who are making that kind of money because so much of that is oriented around the defense industry. >> sreenivasan: kathy lewis, thanks so much for your time. >> thank you. ifill: now let's go to 30,000 feet on this evening from presidential historians and newshour regulars michael beschloss and richard norton smith. you know, michael, i have heard time and time again throughout this campaign that this has been a campaign about small things. the big picture was mis
, it is pressure from the outside of washington. simultaneously, there is something else under way this morning within the republican party saying that we have to change. we cannot go on like this, because we keep narrowing the base, and there are a lot of republicans, very senior republicans who have had success in the past who lookedt that primary procedure and saw that as a prescription to what happened last night. they were running a retro campaign in the 21st century when things have changed and the obama were running a post-modern campaign with technology and the diverse electorate. >> some republicans say a soul searching and other republicans say civil war, david. >> no question that paul ryan is a leader of the party. were they not conservative enough? the fact is that mitt romney won a historic portion of the white vote in america and suffered a bad loss, because the country has changed and looks different. they have to become a more diverse party with the ability to shed some of the orthodoxy around taxes, around spending, over the role of government. and this process is going to beg
. in the suburbs of washington. fairfax county and next door in prince william county. in 2008 in the counties president obama did well against mccain. 61% to 389%. in fairfax. prince william, louden, 54-vi. the president will need to do well there. he has to do well there to run up the vote total and make up for romney strength in south and west of virginia. watching virginia very closely when the polls close. >> well done. >> a state that is critical is virginia. i went for president obama in 2008, but romney needs it. mike emanuel live in richmond. good evening. >> election officials describe turn-out as robust and ahead of 2008 levels. experts predicting the record turn-out in the range of 4 million voters. with long lines across virginia that could be achieved. republican vice presidential nominee paul ryan made one final visit to virginia. the richmond area this afternoon. just hours before the polls close at 7:00 p.m. ryan told campaign staff and volunteers this is are a great effort. they should keep it up. wake up tomorrow morning knowing they did evening they could in virginia. for r
and republicans hold the house, washington on the morning after is going to look very much like washington the day before. >> of course, nicolle wallace who worked in the pal in/mccain campaign four years ago, george w. bush, the huge issue, overwhelming issue, the economy. that is the issue that mitt romney wanted to make his calling card. >> that's right. they are looking at the same information we're looking at as people are still voting, you know, they're hoping that's what they had in mind when they went to the polls day. they made a sales pitch that was 100% about voters being dissatisfied with the pace of recovery. that was the beginning, middle and end of mitt romney's pitch to the american people and they're on the same pins and needles we are to see if it worked. >> donna brazile, one thing we saw, the exitle pos and a surprise to me in the exit polls if we can pull it up now, we asked about the direction of the country and one thing that it showed, donna brazile, who worked for campaign manager for al gore back in 2000, a dramatic reduction over the last year in people who think the cou
editor of the grio and ryan grim, washington bureau chief for "the huffington post." joy, i want to go to you first in terms of the akin and mourdock races, these guys can't help but stepping in it and now it seems like the chickens are coming home to roost. >> thanks to crazy, democrats are going to hold on to the seat. thank you, crazy. i think it's good that these guys ran in the sense that it has ripped the veil off of something that particularly younger women, a lot of democrats either didn't know or didn't want to think about, which is that you have a hard core religious element within the republican party that does believe that women should not be making basic choices about their health care and that women have ruined the workforce for being in it. >> and women being dragged around by their hair and so forth? >> indeed. i'm predicting that mccaskill will do better than that margin. a lot of people say they are going to vote for republican but i have a pretty good feeling she is going to do well. >> ryan, it's amazing how it's turned the departure of senior leadership, the republ
of washington, d.c. and even in florida outside of tampa, they're seeing big turnout numbers there, too. they don't think he can get his 2008 turnout numbers but, scott, as you know tonight, it's going to be all about turnout. >> pelley: yes, it will, jan, thank you very much. the candidate who gets his voters to the polls is likely to win today. norah, turnout is everything and the electorate's been changing since 2008. >> it has. that's one of the things i'm going to be looking at tonight. not only how big is the turnout but the size of the electorate. the different democrat graphic groups. we saw as i pointed out during our evening news that 26% of the electorate in 2008 was a minority electorate. does that grow? does it stay the same or shrink? that will be part of it. the white vote which was about 73% of the vote where will that be tonight? it will speak to not only the changing nature of the country's electorate but also give us clues about which candidate is doing better. >> pelley: bob, the national polls over the last few days, dead heat. dead even for both candidates. it's re
of change, of course not produced the change in washington that he promised in 2008. still, he said his critics are vetting the people turned off by the partisanship of the past four years and depress the voter turnout and he rallied people to go to the polls, here is a bit of what he had to say. >> and that's why i need you, ohio to make sure their voices are heard, to make sure your voices are heard. i want to keep fighting for you, and we've come to far to turn back now. >> the president in mentor, ohio, tomorrow, in columbus, ohio, and we'll see you there. back to you in new york. >> steve: thank you very much. one of the things the president's team the thing that the president has for him is his likability. back in august the president of the united states was 50's oon mitt romney was 40's. according to the brand new washington abc poll, mitt romney and barack obama are currently tied in exactly the same likability. >> gretchen: you could attest to the debate performance for mitt romney would be the first indicator, probably the first one and the president has gone negative and tha
conditions of declining public order. >> i guess there's a tradition in washington d.c. whenever one is asked about making a position come you make one of those predictions. the next 18 months are critical, something along those lines. going to do something very similar. >> that won't won't do it on the sunday morning talk show. >> what i'm going to say here as i think one thing our discussion has alluded to is between the presidency and egypt in a variety of bureaucratic entries. not just the military, but the deep state is going to be very critical. the question of whether he will call a will be extremely important. it's not just the question of that compensation we been waiting for between the president and the various bureaucratic powers, the president, particularly the military and security service. we also look at the relationship between the president and the ear of the muslim brotherhood. is there enough sufficient room for tension between the two sides in such an irreverent end up in a presidency can emerge clicks if that actually happens someday, that sort of the new ballgame in the
around washington. on the other hand, the big strength for governor romney is down in coal country, down in southeastern virginia. then governor romney probably has a better chance around norfolk because of those defense issues down there that you just heard john dickerson talk about. so when we get a better feel as to where most of this vote is turning how the, we'll have a better feel as to whose actually ahead. >> pelley: nora, this gives canada them alot of confidence. >> virginia is key. they feel good about virginia because of that heavy turnout. those exit polls we talked about 52% of the electorate is female. it was actually 54% in 2008. these numbers can change a little bit but suggest the female vote is down a little bit. and one of the toughest fights we saw over women voters was actually in virginia. the after that debate where there was that discussion about binders full of women, romney immediately went on the air in virginia with an ad saying that he is for contraception and then obama came back with another ad contradicting that sniesmght thank yo.>> pelley: thank you .
in washington and certainly talk a lot about that during the conference, but i think the focus right now has to be dealing with this fiscal cliff and putting the competitive agenda in place and if we don't do that i believe that we will not be able to get the kind of economic recovery that we all hope for and that we have been lacking over the last few years. >> let me ask another question. i want to get to the agenda but address at least one more question about the campaign and the republican coalition and that is young people. a lot of discussion in the press the last week or so that you didn't make as many as you thought you would despite the fact a lot of them are living at home and there's not a great job market for them and the president still has about 60% of that vote. is this partly a cultural issue message? is gay marriage for example one of those threshold issues now that makes the republican party look out of touch with those voters? and you have to change that gave republicans talk about that issue? >> yeah. [laughter] >> that's a very big concession because a lot of the colleag
washington to dine at the white house was taken as an outrage in many corridors. america today is a world away from the cruel and prideful bigotry of that time. there is no better evidence of this than the election of an african-american to the presidency of the united states. >> senator mccain was right. that at no other time in american history could this moment have been possible. and even as the opponent, he was a bit swept up in that moment. remember the front page of the new york times after the election, obama, racial barrier falls in decisive victory. the victory was decisive, but the barrier had not fallen. then senator obama was simply hoisted over it, propelled by decades of civil rights demonstrations. hard won legislative victories, educational opportunities and shifting racial boundaries. but senator mccain, "the new york times" and frankly many pundits writing in the heady moments of the victory failed to articulate how firmly the barriers remained intabt. the win was a culmination, not the single definitive, most sought after culmination, but a culmination of racial strugg
of washington, d.c. he there introduced president obama to a crowd of supporters. before the president made his case to virginia voters. today, the presidents started a four-state double team strategy. in new hampshire in front of 14,000 supporters, president clinton was moving on to north carolina. because president clinton can't be in two places at once, he let his words speak for him in iowa. he wrote -- >> joinianna marie cox, the toi striking how much this relationship has warmed up in the last four years. >> it is. at first, you could tell clinton was being a good soldier. he was going out and doing what he needed to do, wasn't having maybe the best time. over the past year, i think we've seen clinton starting to have the good time he always has, and that turning into, yeah, a bromance between the two of them. like that last rally, think did the high five. they're getting there. >> let's talk about the fact that they are getting along better is a good thing, but clinton and his appeal to a class of voter that the president has not been able to crack, which is white working class voters. >
washington post" was asked about the decision, do you approve of the decision to keep open the guantanamo prison for terror suspects. 70% of the american people who answered that survey said yes, we approve of it. i want people to understand who we're talking about transferring from guantanamo bay to the united states of america. understand the individuals and some of their backgrounds who are being held at guantanamo bay, coming to a neighborhood near you. this is, of course, the mastermind of september 11, khalid sheik mohammed who is being held at guantanamo bay. he's often called k.s.m., he's described as the mastermind of the 9/11 attacks. he claims to have personally decapitated american journalist daniel pearl in 2002 and committed to playing a part in 30 terrorist plots, including a 1995 plot to blow up 12 u.s. airliners flying from southeast asia to the united states for which he was indicted the following year, 1993 world trade center bombing, a plot to hit towers in chicago, new york, los angeles, and nuclear power stations. he claimed he was involved in a plot to assassinate p
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

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